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2011 OQ Report

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2011 OQ REPORT

2011 OFFENSIVE LEADERS BY POSITION

AMERICAN LEAGUE  
     
C Alex Avila  
1B Miguel Cabrera  
2B Dustin Pedroia  
SS Jhonny Peralta  
3B Evan Longoria  
LF Alex Gordon  
CF Curtis Granderson  
RF Jose Bautista  
DH David Ortiz  


NATIONAL LEAGUE  
     
C Brian McCann  
1B Prince Fielder  
2B Brandon Phillips  
SS Troy Tulowitzki  
3B Aramis Ramirez  
LF Ryan Braun  
CF Matt Kemp  
RF Mike Stanton  

Bold
indicates 2010 leaders.

To qualify for this list, a player must play at least half his team’s games at the defensive position indicated.

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2011 AMERICAN LEAGUE OQ LEADERS

 
Rank
 
Player
Team
OQ
 
 
 
 
 
1
 
Bautista
TOR
185
 
 
2
 
Cabrera
DET
176
 
 
3
 
Ortiz
BOS
152
 
 
4
 
Gonzalez
BOS
150
 
 
5
 
Granderson
NY
141
 
 
6
 
Konerko
CHI
140
 
 
7
 
Avila
DET
140
 
 
8
 
Ellsbury
BOS
138
 
 
9
 
Pedroia
BOS
131
 
 
10
 
Gordon
KC
131
 
 
 
 
 
11
 
Hamilton
TEX
131
 
 
12
 
Longoria
TAM
130
 
 
13
 
Beltre,A
TEX
130
 
 
14
 
Swisher
NY
127
 
 
15
 
Cano
NY
127
 
 
16
 
Kinsler
TEX
124
 
 
17
 
Youkilis
BOS
124
 
 
18
 
Santana
CLE
124
 
 
19
 
Martinez
DET
124
 
 
20
 
Teixeira
NY
123
 
 
 
 
 
21
 
Young
TEX
123
 
 
22
 
Zobrist
TAM
122
 
 
23
 
Joyce
TAM
120
 
 
24
 
Butler
KC
120
 
 
25
 
Reynolds
BAL
119
 
 
26
 
Peralta
DET
118
 
 
27
 
Cruz
TEX
117
 
 
28
 
Willingham
OAK
117
 
 
29
 
Cuddyer
MIN
114
 
 
30
 
Hardy
BAL
112
 
 
 
 
 
31
 
Cabrera
KC
112
 
 
32
 
Francoeur
KC
112
 
 
33
 
Escobar
TOR
112
 
 
34
 
Hosmer
KC
112
 
 
35
 
Kotchman
TAM
111
 
 
36
 
Encarnacion
TOR
111
 
 
37
 
Wieters
BAL
110
 
 
38
 
Kendrick
LA
109
 
 
39
 
Upton
TAM
109
 
 
40
 
Cabrera,A
CLE
109
 
 
 
 
 
41
 
Hunter
LA
108
 
 
42
 
Jones
BAL
107
 
 
43
 
Markakis
BAL
105
 
 
44
 
Trumbo
LA
104
 
 
45
 
Callaspo
LA
104
 
 
46
 
Abreu
LA
104
 
 
47
 
Bourjos
LA
103
 
 
48
 
Damon
TAM
102
 
 
49
 
Jeter
NY
100
 
 
50
 
Moreland
TEX
100
 
 
 
 
 
51
 
Lind
TOR
100
 
 
52
 
Aybar
LA
99
 
 
53
 
Ramirez
CHI
98
 
 
54
 
Gardner
NY
98
 
 
55
 
Matsui
OAK
96
 
 
56
 
Pierzynski
CHI
95
 
 
57
 
Andrus
TEX
94
 
 
58
 
Guerrero
BAL
94
 
 
59
 
DeJesus
OAK
94
 
 
60
 
Jackson
DET
93
 
 
 
 
 
61
 
Crisp
OAK
93
 
 
62
 
Suzuki
OAK
91
 
 
63
 
Pennington
OAK
91
 
 
64
 
Crawford
BOS
90
 
 
65
 
Young
MIN/DET
90
 
 
66
 
Valencia
MIN
90
 
 
67
 
Andino
BAL
88
 
 
68
 
Wells
LA
86
 
 
69
 
Olivo
SEA
83
 
 
70
 
Pierre
CHI
82
 
 
 
 
 
71
 
Dunn
CHI
81
 
 
72
 
Suzuki
SEA
80
 
 
73
 
Beckham
CHI
79
 
 
74
 
Escobar
KC
78
 
 
75
 
Rios
CHI
77
 

The 2011 American League base-to-out ratio was .671, the lowest mark since 1992.

This list includes every player who had at least 3 (at bats + walks) for each game his team played.

OQs of selected nonqualifiers, American League: Dustin Ackley SEA 110, J.P. Arencibia TOR 99, Brennan Boesch DET 112, Michael Brantley CLE 93, Lonnie Chisenhall CLE 91, Sin-Soo Choo CLE 101, J.D. Drew BOS 83, Travis Hafner CLE 116, Desmond Jennings TAM 116, Andruw Jones NY 128, Ryan Kalish BOS 95, Jason Kipnis CLE 120, Jason Kubel MIN 107, Matt LaPorta CLE 94, Brett Lawrie TOR 145, Derrek Lee BAL 95, Russell Martin NY 103, Joe Mauer MIN 100, Justin Morneau MIN 78, David Murphy TEX 99, Mike Napoli TEX 173, Magglio Ordonez DET 80, Jorge Posada NY 100, Carlos Quentin CHI 116, Ryan Raburn DET 97, Colby Rasmus TOR 64, Nolan Reimold BAL 110, Alex Rodriguez NY 121, Justin Smoak SEA 102, Eric Thames TOR 105, Jim Thome MIN/CLE 129, Mike Trout LA 89.

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2011 NATIONAL LEAGUE OQ LEADERS

 
Rank
 
Player
Team
OQ
 
 
 
 
 
1
 
Fielder
MIL
167
 
 
2
 
Berkman
STL
163
 
 
3
 
Kemp
LA
163
 
 
4
 
Braun
MIL
162
 
 
5
 
Votto
CIN
160
 
 
6
 
Beltran
NY/SF
147
 
 
7
 
Holliday
STL
145
 
 
8
 
Tulowitzki
COL
145
 
 
9
 
Pujols
STL
143
 
 
10
 
Stanton
FLA
141
 
 
 
 
 
11
 
Gonzalez
COL
138
 
 
12
 
Morse
WAS
138
 
 
13
 
Upton
ARI
137
 
 
14
 
Pence
HOU/PHI
134
 
 
15
 
Reyes
NY
134
 
 
16
 
Pena
CHI
133
 
 
17
 
Hart
MIL
133
 
 
18
 
Ramirez
CHI
131
 
 
19
 
Howard
PHI
129
 
 
20
 
Victorino
PHI
129
 
 
 
 
 
21
 
McCutchen,A
PIT
128
 
 
22
 
Smith
COL
125
 
 
23
 
McCann
ATL
125
 
 
24
 
Jones
ATL
125
 
 
25
 
Bruce
CIN
124
 
 
26
 
Weeks
MIL
123
 
 
27
 
Montero
ARI
122
 
 
28
 
Fowler
COL
121
 
 
29
 
Morrison
FLA
120
 
 
30
 
Molina
STL
119
 
 
 
 
 
31
 
Ethier
LA
118
 
 
32
 
Sanchez
COL
117
 
 
33
 
Phillips
CIN
117
 
 
34
 
Lee
HOU
117
 
 
35
 
Freeman
ATL
117
 
 
36
 
Roberts
ARI
116
 
 
37
 
Parra
ARI
115
 
 
38
 
Young
ARI
113
 
 
39
 
Uggla
ATL
113
 
 
40
 
Bonifacio
FLA
109
 
 
 
 
 
41
 
Castro
CHI
108
 
 
42
 
Soriano
CHI
108
 
 
43
 
Loney
LA
108
 
 
44
 
Walker
PIT
106
 
 
45
 
Rollins
PHI
106
 
 
46
 
Werth
WAS
105
 
 
47
 
Espinosa
WAS
104
 
 
48
 
Bay
NY
103
 
 
49
 
Bourn
HOU/ATL
102
 
 
50
 
Maybin
SD
101
 
 
 
 
 
51
 
Ibanez
PHI
99
 
 
52
 
Carroll
LA
99
 
 
53
 
Pagan
NY
98
 
 
54
 
Buck
FLA
97
 
 
55
 
Stubbs
CIN
96
 
 
56
 
Ludwick
SD/PIT
95
 
 
57
 
Huff
SF
95
 
 
58
 
Infante
FLA
94
 
 
59
 
Prado
ATL
93
 
 
60
 
Polanco
PHI
92
 
 
61
 
Desmond
WAS
87
 
 
62
 
McGehee
MIL
86
 
 
63
 
Betancourt
MIL
85
 
 
64
 
Barney
CHI
85
 
 
65
 
Gonzalez
ATL
84
 
 
66
 
Bartlett
SD
81
 

The 2011 National League base-to-out ratio was .645, the lowest mark since 1992.

This list includes every player who had at least 3 (at bats + walks) for each game his team played.

OQs of selected nonqualifiers, National League: Pedro Alvarez PIT 75, Rick Ankiel WAS 90, Clint Barmes HOU 97, Brandon Belt SF 100, Domonic Brown PHI 108, Marlon Byrd CHI 96, Tyler Colvin CHI 68, Ike Davis NY 150, Lucas "Sin" Duda NY 130, Freese STL 113, Jason Giambi COL 153, Eric Goldschmidt ARI 125, Jonny Gomes CIN/WAS 107, Chris Heisey CIN 116, Todd Helton COL 134, Jason Heyward ATL 104, Jon Jay STL 107, Garrett Jones PIT 112, Derrek Lee PIT 155, John Mayberry PHI 130, Nate McLouth ATL 100, Aaron Miles LA 86, Nyjer Morgan MIL 105, Daniel Murphy NY 116, Laynce Nix WAS 108, Lyle Overbay PIT/ARI 94, Buster Posey SF 108, Hanley Ramirez FLA 104, Colby Rasmus STL 114, Scott Rolen CIN 89, Cody Ross SF 107, Pablo Sandoval SF 142, Justin Turner NY 93, Chase Utley PHI 109, Ty Wigginton COL 105, David Wright NY 117, Ryan Zimmerman WAS 119.

Offensive performance has returned to normalcy, and tighter controls on PED use is not the only explanation. Baseball is blessed once again with a plethora of pitching stars, and that is good for the game.

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SPEND MORE, WIN LESS (1)

Older fans may pine for the days when the discussion about baseball did not revolve around money. With those days gone, they might console themselves with the thought that on the field, between the lines, the game itself has not changed. But it has changed. Money has changed it. Here are two examples.

When I was a lad, if the game was close in the late innings and your starting pitcher got into a jam, you brought in your best relief pitcher to "put out the fire." Now the guy you bring in is often not your best relief pitcher but one of your worst. In other words, you entrust the outcome of the game to one of your weakest performers.

Although this practice is self-defeating, there's an explanation for it. The relief pitchers who make the big money are the ones who accumulate saves, which are awarded to a pitcher who finishes the game by protecting a lead of three runs or fewer. The best relief pitcher on your team, designated as "the closer," is employed only in "save situations." He is rarely summoned before the ninth inning and never before the eighth, and never when his team is trailing. That leaves inferior pitchers to cope with situations that are more dangerous.

Say the Yankees and Athletics are tied in the seventh at Yankee Stadium. Oakland loads the bases with one out, and New York starter Bartolo Colon has obviously run out of gas. Does manager Joe Girardi call for Mariano Rivera, baseball's best relief pitcher, to shut down the A's? In today's baseball, that would be unthinkable. Girardi will leave Rivera in the pen even if it costs him the game, because he assumes that Rivera will object to being asked to quell a seventh inning rally in a non-save situation. He brings in Scott Proctor, Oakland bats around, and New York loses.

Girardi sleeps like a baby that night, confident he made the right decision. But New York's defeat in this hypothetical game has everything to do with the team's salary structure. Joe G believes he should funnel all saves to Rivera and keep Rivera out of games where no save is possible. Hence, his best relief pitcher, his most effective weapon, is too proud to enter the game when the outcome is really on the line.

Girardi and Rivera are only adhering to the conventional wisdom of today. But why, logically, should Scott Proctor be placed deliberately in position to lose a game? Because Girardi is afraid to alienate the great Rivera, which he will surely do if he jeopardizes Rivera's earning power, which is based on saves.

Before the concept of a relief specialist was universally embraced, managers would call for their best pitchers (i.e. starting pitchers) to relieve in tense situations like the one I outlined above. These keen competitors wanted to be out there. Dizzy Dean, for example, averaged 34 starts plus 15 relief appearances (all in clutch situations) during the five-year period of 1932-1936.

In effect, Dean was C.C. Sabathia and Mariano Rivera rolled into one, and he handled the role. Dean's great rival Carl Hubbell was used similarly. Winning the game was everything. If you were going to get beat, the thinking was, get beat with your best.

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SPEND MORE, WIN LESS (2)

In December, Washington signed 31-year-old outfielder Jayson Werth to a seven-year, $126 million contract. Werth rewarded fans with 107 runs produced and a 105 OQ (barely above par) in 150 games. Philadelphia, his old team, did just fine without him, while Washington did not contend. It's no stretch to say that Werth did not earn his hefty paycheck.

Werth's performance was uninspiring, and there is some evidence that his clubhouse agitation helped bring about the resignation of manager Jim Riggleman, who had the team playing above .500 in late June.

Werth started cold and never caught fire. But when the season ended, he defended his performance. "I could have hit .330 with 30 and 100," he told reporter Adam Kilgore. "Would we have been in playoff contention? Probably not." (Question for Werth: if you could have, why didn't you?)

Werth played every day, and Washington fans came to the ballpark knowing he was going to play no matter how many times he struck out (a career-high 160) or how many easy ground balls he poked to the shortstop. That's demoralizing, but if a player is healthy (which Werth was), you don't keep all those millions on the bench. Werth could have hit like Adam Dunn and kept his job, and that's going to be true for the next six seasons. But a team cannot win with feeble offensive contributions from its outfielders.

The Nationals might have an outfield prospect in their farm system who can give them what Werth did, or better. More runs mean more wins, but Werth is going to play whether he hits or not. If he doesn't hit, he's not accountable, and he won't be benched.

The Nationals lost games because Werth didn't hit, just as the White Sox lost games because Dunn didn't hit and the Red Sox lost games because Carl Crawford didn't hit. We see it all around baseball: too often, inferior players play because they once built a reputation that earned them a big contract. Salary considerations affect the game on the field.

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KISS ALBERT GOODBYE

Albert Pujols' 11th season was an excellent season, yet it was his worst season, and there is reason to believe that he has passed his peak. Nevertheless, this celebrated free agent is seeking a 10-year contract at top dollar, well upwards of $200 million.

Pujols admits to an age of 31 (32 on Opening Day 2012) and is widely believed to be a couple of years older. Always a poor baserunner, he is now visibly slowing down in every aspect of his game. Additionally, he has developed an alarming propensity for grounding into double plays, just as slugger Jim Rice did when his skills began to decline.

If the Cardinals sign Pujols to the type of contract he is asking for, they can expect to decline as a force in the National League Central. They will be betting big money that Pujols' next ten years will resemble his first ten years. That's a sucker bet, but ownership may authorize it in the belief that if the Cardinals allow Pujols to sign with another team, fans will boycott Busch Stadium en masse.

If that's what they think, they are wrong. The Cardinals will have to break the bank to keep Pujols, but the Albert Pujols of 2011 can be replaced. The team won 90 games with Pujols and can win 90 without him if they spend their money wisely. All it will take is some astute player procurement and development.

The foremost determinant of fan satisfaction is a winning record. On any given day, what most fans desire most is to watch the home team win. The Cardinals' revenue pie is not going to grow, and if they cut Pujols a larger slice, everyone else is going to get less. If the Cardinals were to re-sign Pujols but reduce the rest of their payroll in order to afford to pay him, and the Cardinals embarked on an extended run of last-place finishes a la the Orioles or the Pirates, fan interest would certainly disintegrate even if Pujols plays every game for the next ten years (which he won't).

Suppose that Pujols were to announce that he was voluntarily retiring to enter a monastery, or that he were to suffer a career-ending accident in the off-season (as Roy Campanella did in January 1958). This superb player would never perform in a Cardinal uniform again, but fans would not stop caring about the Cardinals. Ultimately their loyalty is to the uniform, not the player. When old heroes fade away, new ones must emerge. The Cardinals would be better advised to spend their money in developing young players. This is what the team really needs, because their minor league system has been unproductive.

If I owned the Cardinals, my offer to Pujols would be four years at the top salary in baseball. If that's not enough, let him walk. The fans will mourn, and when their grief runs its course, they will return to the ballpark.

Alex Rodriguez, he of the ten-year, $275 million contract, is now 36 years old. Over the last four seasons he has missed 24, 38, 25, and 63 games. His body is breaking down as every aging athlete's must. I don't expect to see Rodriguez play regularly again unless the Yankees make him their full-time designated hitter. New York can afford to overpay whatever it takes to keep a winning team on the field because, in the absence of revenue sharing, their pie is a lot bigger than anyone else's. On the Yankee roster A-Rod is one star among many, and the fortunes of the club don't rise or fall solely on his contributions.

Outside of New York, neither St. Louis nor anyone else can afford to give Pujols a Rodriguez-like contract. Whoever signs him to one will sink like a stone in a few short years, leaving player, management, and fans resentful and embittered.

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THE WORST DH EVER?

However you feel about Adam Dunn, nobody wanted to see the kind of season he turned in for the White Sox: 67 runs produced and an 81 OQ in 122 excruciating games. Dunn's strategy of deliberately taking or fouling off hittable pitches, which I discussed in the 2008 OQ Report, has finally backfired, because he no longer seems capable of putting hittable pitches in play. That Dunn is a designated hitter, a player whose only expectation is to hit, makes this story even worse.

Chicago fans were disgusted and other fans embarrassed by Dunn's nonperformance. Throughout the season I watched with horrified fascination as "The Big Donkey" gave up at-bats the way pitchers often do. The White Sox could have promoted any Triple-A farmhand and achieved better results.

Was Dunn the worst designated hitter ever (that is, since 1973, when the position was created)?

What we're talking about is the worst regular designated hitter, not some palooka who DHed for a week or a month. I define a regular as a player who had at least three (at bats + walks) for each game his team played. The White Sox played 162 games, and Dunn had 415 at bats and walked 75 times, so he qualified as a regular. But Dunn played 37 games at first base and 2 in right field, and at this time I have not been able to determine whether Dunn was the designated hitter in at least half of Chicago's games.

What I really want to know is how Dunn batted when he was used strictly as a DH. I don't have that information yet. I can assure you that there have been some putrid designated hitters in the last four decades, and they all have one thing in common: they weren't invited back the following year. But 2011 was Dunn's first season of a four-year, $56 million pact he signed last December. He'll be just 32 on Opening Day. What on earth are the White Sox going to do with him?

When I obtain the final 2011 DH stats I'll post a short article on Dunn elsewhere on the website.

Speaking of bad designated hitters, it's time to pull the plug on Vladimir Guerrero. At 36, he has nothing left to give. Unlike Dunn, though, Guerrero was at one time a great player, one of the best in the game.

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CAVALCADE OF CATCHERS

"The catcher is the greatest asset you can have." …Don Larsen

Pittsburgh's Michael McKenry may have earned a job as the Bucs' regular backstop in 2012. As the season ended McKenry told a Post-Gazette reporter, "I have a ton of pride when it comes to catching… I love it. I like it when the ball hits me in the face mask. I like having bruised thumbs and bruises all over my chest. I eat it up. I couldn't imagine playing any other position." You gotta love that attitude.

Meanwhile, the venerable Ivan Rodriguez is rolling to a standstill. Rodriguez caught just 37 games for the Nationals, increasing his record career total to 2427. He spent two months on the disabled list. I believe we witnessed I-Rod's swan song on the final day of the season, when he caught Stephen Strasburg's only major league victory of 2011.

Rodriguez will be 40 on Opening Day. I think he's too rickety to tempt any team to sign him, notwithstanding Scott Boras's assertion that "Pudge is not a man who has high regard for medical science."

Following two extensive surgeries on his throwing shoulder, Kansas City's Jason Kendall, who is three years younger than Rodriguez, did not play in 2011 and is not expected to play in 2012. His career is probably over. With 2025 games caught, Kendall is the fifth backstop in history to catch over 2000 games. His career won-lost record stands at 938-1045 with 42 no-decisions.

No receiver caught his 1000th game in 2011, but as many as four catchers may surpass that significant milestone in 2012. Rod Barajas (966), Brian Schneider (963), Miguel Olivo (947) and Yadier Molina (928) are the currently active catchers closest to 1000. On Opening Day Barajas will be 36, Schneider 35, Olivo 33, and Molina 29.

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BOSTON MASSACRE

I can explain the collapse of the Red Sox with two words: John Farrell. All of Boston's pitchers, with the exception of Jonathan Papelbon, regressed once Farrell left to manage the Blue Jays. Boston can't get Farrell back, but ownership will have to effect a major shakeup to rekindle fan enthusiasm in New England. Simply throwing money at the problem won't do it. General Manager Theo Epstein has spent hundreds of millions, but not all of his deals, maybe not half of them, have been smart.

Yankee GM Brian Cashman says Brett Gardner is a better player than Carl Crawford, and now that the 2011 results are in, that's a proposition difficult to dispute. Gardner hits better, fields better, runs better, handles pressure better, and is two years younger. And the Yankees developed him in-house.

By the way, the 2011 Negative World Series would pit Houston versus Minnesota. Would a Boston versus Atlanta NWS also be appropriate?

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JAGGED EDGE II

Cubs outfielder Tyler Colvin, once considered one of the National League's brightest prospects, suffered through a dismal season at the plate and in the field and at 26 faces an uncertain future. You may recall that Colvin's chest was impaled by the sharp end of a splintered maple bat while he was running the bases in September 2010. No legislation to ban these bats has been forthcoming. There is clearly a safety issue here, but the players union, as it did with steroids, opposes the prohibition of maple bats. Stand by for lawsuits.

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RUMINATIONS

* Yes, I am trying to absorb all those hip new stats. But you lose me when you declare that pitching wins are irrelevant. Wins don't matter? Tell that to Cy Young.

* Wouldn't you like to see rotund free agent Prince Fielder sign with the Giants? Visualize an infield safeguarded by Fielder at first and roly poly Pablo Sandoval at third.

* Have the Tigers given up on southpaw Fu-Te Ni, who spent the year in Toledo and was never called up despite decent numbers?

* You take Brandon Phillips. I'll take Bubba Phillips.

* I'm still hoping for a breakthrough from 7-1 Angels farmhand Ludovicus Jacobus Maria Van Mil. He pitched well at Double-A Arkansas, but at age 27 he may be running out of time.

* Goodbye Manny Ramirez. You've been replaced by Miguel Cabrera.

* "Derek Lowe? That ferry has already gone across the Bosporus." Best utterance by a radio analyst in 2011, spoken by SiriusXM's Rob Dibble on July 28.

* I haven't heard a nickname this year I like better than "The Melk Man" (Kansas City center fielder Melky Cabrera). Happily for Cabrera, he delivered the type of season that has fans talking about him again.

* Want to breathe new life into the All-Star Game festivities? Stage a home run derby for pitchers! If you're handicapping, bet on Carlos Zambrano.

* Washington lefthanded reliever Atahualpa Severino, although named for the last sovereign emperor of the Incas, is not Peruvian. He hails from the Dominican Republic.

* You take Darren O'Day. I'll take Dennis Day.

* Sports headline of the year: "It's No Holiday When You Face Halladay" by Hal McCoy (Dayton Daily News, August 30). Now you know why McCoy is in the writer's wing of the Baseball Hall of Fame. Or maybe it's for phrases like this: "Yonder Alonso runs as if he not only carries a piano on his back, but stops to play it between home and first."

* Remember the name: Royals third base prospect Cheslor Cuthbert. If he makes it (and he played looked good in the Midwest League this year), he'll be the first major leaguer ever to hail from Corn Island, Nicaragua.

* Speaking of farmhands, the Cubs signed 25th round pick Rock Shoulders for a cool $294,000. The first baseman came out of a Florida junior college.

* Christmas came early for the Detroit Tigers, who signed 16-year-old Dominican third baseman Adelin Santa to a bonus contract in July.

* Yes, Dodgers outfielder Eugenio Velez really did finish the 2011 season with 37 at bats and 0 hits. He drew two bases on balls, however. Who would walk this non-threat? I might forgive raw rookie Josh Collmenter, who passed Velez in the fourth inning of Arizona's 9-5 loss on July 29 and was promptly removed from the game. But what was control artist Cliff Lee's excuse when he threw four wide ones to Velez on August 9?

* Joe Mauer is the modern B.J. Surhoff.

* Pedro Beato is the modern Ed Bauta.

* Yu Darvish is coming. At last.

When in Ljubljana, stay at the Hotel Cubo.

October 2011

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